FAQ: Recipes

Where do your recipes come from?

A variety of sources – old cookbooks, clippings from old newspapers and magazines, and family recipe collections. We try to provide information about the sources if we can. Sometimes we just don’t have much to go but still want to share what we’ve found.

Where do the dates come from on your recipes?

The date at the end of a recipe is the year of the printed source we used.

This doesn’t mean that the original, earliest version of that recipe is from that date. Many recipes are in use for years (sometimes decades) before publication. (Many more recipes are never captured in print.) We have examples of recipes through different decades and enjoy seeing how they change to suit new food trends – or not.

We try to select dishes that are reflective of cultural and culinary trends of a decade, like the obsession with all things Hawaiian in the 1960’s.

I think this recipe is older than the date you listed! My great-aunt/uncle's/neighbor used to make it!

That’s likely true! All our source recipes are probably much older than the date we list.

We are referencing the date of the published source of the recipe. Many published recipes are based on much older inspirations or were “modern” revisions of beloved favorites.

What is an adaptation? Why do all your recipes say “adapted from” mean?

“Adapted from” means that some aspect of the recipe has been altered and/or adjusted from the original. Sometimes that means adjusting proportions, adding or changing steps in preparations or adding a new ingredient.  Many older recipes are vague and we are left approximating how much, how long, when, and just what.  What exactly is “season well” or “cook in a moderate oven”? How can I recreate it? When we test a recipe, we take time to fill in the blanks and the end result is our adaptation of that recipe.

Typically we make note of what adjustments were made from the original in case anyone wants to create a more historically accurate version without the adaptations.

Can I substitute ____ for ____?

Maybe? There are some great substitution guides in the wilds of the internet that can help guide you. However, when it comes down to it, the best way to find out if your substitution idea will actually work (and be to your taste) is by making the recipe with your substitution(s).

Will you be adding nutritional information to your recipes?

We won’t completely rule it out the possibility of someday, but for the foreseeable future: no.  There are other features and content we’re excited about developing.

If you are curious about the nutritional information of a recipe, we recommend this recipe analysis tool. Simply cut and paste the recipe you are interested in, removing or adding any ingredients and adjusting serving sizes to what you actually make or eat.

Can I post or write about one of your recipes?

Of course! We’d appreciate it if you link back to our recipe(s) as the source and inspiration.

However, please use your own words and photos to describe the recipe, it’s directions, and your unique experience making it. By doing this, you are creating new content and staying clear of creating duplicate content and potential copyright violations.  Be inspired, not a copy-and-paster.

How do recipe copyrights work?

From the U.S. Copyright Office: “A mere listing of ingredients is not protected under copyright law. However, where a recipe or formula is accompanied by substantial literary expression in the form of an explanation or directions, or when there is a collection of recipes as in a cookbook, there may be a basis for copyright protection.”

Short-hand version:

  • Lists of ingredients = not protected by copyright.
  • Directions and instructions =  can be protected copyright.
  • Copying and pasting whole recipes = copyright violation.

Get inspired, make great food, and your own content. 

FAQ: Site and Site Usage

Where is my comment? I submitted one and it isn’t there.

All comments are held for approval. It could be we haven’t had the chance to hit approve yet.

Why are comments closed?

We have closed comments on some of our older recipes. Nothing personal. As the number of recipes grew so did the management aspect of approving valid comments and deleting spam or other faux comments.

I found a mistake! How do I tell you?

I found a mistake! How do I tell you?

Two options.

  1. If comments are still open on a recipe, post in the comments section.
  2. If you’d like to stay anonymous or if commenting on the page where the error is closed, send us a message through the contact form.

And thanks for helping out!

Can I post or write about one of your recipes?

Of course! We’d appreciate it if you link back to our recipe(s) as the source and inspiration.

However, please use your own words and photos to describe the recipe, its directions, and your unique experience making it. By doing this, you are creating new content and staying clear of creating duplicate content and potential copyright violations.  Be inspired, not a copy-and-paster.

Who is behind this site?

Visit our About page to answer this and more.